109. The King of the Jungle Doesn’t Live in the Jungle – And Other Facts You Probably Already Know About Lions


Lions live in grasslands and plains.
They do not live in the jungle.


The lion is the only member of the cat family that displays obvious markings (its mane) that distinguish the male from the female.
A male’s mane grows darker as it ages.  Female lions prefer males with fuller, thicker, darker manes.

The roar of a lion can be heard from 5 miles away.
Lions use their roar as a form of communication. It identifies individuals, strengthens the pride’s bond, and lets other animals know of the pride’s domain.


A new-born lion has dark spots,
which fade as the cub reaches adulthood


Daughters stay with their mothers for life and may eventually have their own cubs. Sons will leave the pride at maturity in search of a pride of their own.

Unlike most other cat species, lions live in large groups called prides. A pride consists of multiple related females, their dependent offspring and two or three unrelated males. In the wild, lions rest for around 20 hours a day.

Female lions are the pride’s primary hunters.
The males are first to eat when the female lions return with their kill.
The kill is not shared equally within a pride, and at times of prey scarcity, cubs might experience higher mortality rates as hungry females may not even share with their offspring.
A pride isn’t formed primarily for catching dinner or sharing parenting chores. They also need each other to ward off the dangerous advances of other lions.



A tuft at the end of the tail is a distinct characteristic of the lion.

African Lions May Be Extinct by 2050.

African lions may be facing extinction by the year 2050. The reason for the decline of the king of beasts can be summed up in one word: people. As more East Africans take up farming and ranching, they push farther into lion country.
In just two decades, populations decreased by 43 percent. It’s estimated that as few as 23,000 remain today.